glamourweaver:

semblanceofnormality:

in all my life, I have never encountered such an astounding act of trolling as the time I spent an hour and a half downloading what I thought was a Good Omens fanmix and then discovering that it was a Best of Queen album.

image

(Source: oh-those-dead-frenchboys, via fasach)

Be the person Uncle Iroh knows you can be

(Source: mintleaftea, via sarahsketches)

"Shortly after announcing his plans to direct a movie about first U.S. president George Washington, acclaimed director Steve McQueen (12 Years A Slave, Shame) revealed that he intended to cast Idris Elba, known for his roles in Pacific Rim, Thor, and the BBC program Luther, in the starring role.

The film, Washington, will chronicle the titular president’s life over the course of his eight years as President of the United States.

“I’m very excited for this project,” McQueen told us. “It goes without saying, this was a monumentally significant period in history, and George Washington was, and continues to be, a very significant figure. I hope I can do it justice.”

Following the announcement, the Twittersphere immediately went abuzz in confusion, outrage, and controversy. One person tweeted, “how can you cast a black man? washington was white #smh”. Another said, “damn hollywood. how u gonna change someone’s race? what if we did that 2 other races? they’d riot #hypocrisy”.

However, McQueen responded to this controversy, saying, “I understand it looks like an unusual decision. But at the end of the day, it wasn’t about casting someone who was the right race. We went with the person who was the most talented, the most qualified, and that just happened to be Idris [Elba]. I think people will agree when they watch the movie, he truly captures who Washington was on the inside.”

Washington is scheduled to release December 11, 2015."

Idris Elba Cast As George Washington In New Film

The Wishwashington Post

(via thewishwashingtonpost)

bless.

(via bereweillschmidt)

so this is basically the “we cast the best person for the role and welp they just happened to be white oh well” excuse turned on its head

(via wellmanicuredman)

Ha!

(via birdsy-purplefishes)

I LIIIIIIIIIIIIVE!!!!!!!!!!!!

HAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

(via brandnewjones)

If you don’t fux with Steve McQueen, you should reconsider your life choices. This mothafucka here is FANTASTIC! YASSSSSSSSSS!

(via kyssthis16)

I SWEAR TO FUCKING GOD I WILL GO TO SEE THIS FUCKING MOVIE

OH MY GOD

Y’ALL

EVERYBODY WHO TOLD ME RACE DON’T MATTER BETTER TAKE THEIR ASS TO THE MOVIE THEATER

EVERYBODY WHO TOLD US ‘BEST ACTOR FOR THE JOB’ BETTER TAKE THEIR ASS TO THE MOVIE THEATER AND SEE THIS MOVIE

(via sourcedumal)

Thoroughly on point.

(via theguruburu)

Where’s that post listing all the people of color who were cast with white actors? Like Jake Gyllenhaal as an Egyptian prince and whatnot? 

(via bookoisseur)

(via bookoisseur)

thefrogman:

[reddit]

pastelnerd said: So that swing dancing gif had a lot ladies dancing together in pairs which is something you don't see a lot of nowadays. Was it because dancing alone or as a group wasn't really a thing back then? Did guys ever dance together as friends like that?

historicallyaccuratesteve:

lindyloowho:

historicallyaccuratesteve:

Dancing in pairs was definitely a thing at the time— there doesn’t seem to have been a lot of solo or group dancing, at least not in the way we dance today.

Dancetime Publications has a breakdown of dancing in the 1930s. There were group dances and circle dances (like square dancing or contra), and many dances had callers to tell you the steps as you went.

I’m guessing that it was socially acceptable for women to dance with each other and less so for men to do so, but I don’t know that for certain. It probably depended at least in part on the social setting and the ratio of men to women at any given event.

::Cracks knuckles:: 

I hear you want to talk about gender and swing dancing in the context of the 1930s and 1940s! PLEASE YES LET’S DO.

(First, some terminology: “swing dancing” is a pretty broad category that covers a ton of different partner and group dances. What the hep cats in New York City danced in the ballrooms up in Harlem should rightly be called Lindy hop. It’s a dance that’s incredibly free-form and energetic. See examples here, here, and here. As for your “solo or group dancing,” you’re right. Any solo or group dancing was definitely secondary to partner dancing, though it was practiced. One very common form of group dancing was a jam, where people get into a circle and watch one couple at a time. Here is a still image of that happening, though it may have been staged for the LIFE photographer.)

There’s a post that’s circulating around the Lindy hop tumblr community about the history of gender in the dance. Here’s what started it all: 

image

Dawn Hampton is one of the original Lindy hoppers (and is still alive and killing it today, btw). The Frankie she mentions above is Frankie Manning (the overalls guy in the third Lindy hop example), who is largely considered to be the world’s greatest Lindy hopper ever. 

The places where Lindy hop was being danced and developed in New York City were largely the clubs in Harlem. The most famous club (that was also desegregated) was the Savoy Ballroom. 

A Cliff’s Notes version of gender and Lindy hop is this: the original, serious dancers would dance with anybody, even before the war. They practiced day and night, and they practiced with whomever they could. Pre-war, among the community that was less serious about dancing (and viewed it more as a social activity), it was probably more common for women to dance with women than for men to dance with men. During the war, men dancing with men and women dancing with women was much more common.

And now, to the main event! Here’s a video of women dancing together in 1939:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WB28EIKC4DE

And here’s a video of men dancing together sometime during the war:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEp1-oo9u98 (It’s looped; the original clip is only a few seconds long.)

Here are Al Minns and Leon James, two of the original Savoy Lindy hoppers dancing both solo dancing (Charleston) and together: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJsBa2u9aMQ

There’s so much more I could say, but I’ll stop now. In case you want to do your own research…

Further reading:

Frankie Manning, Ambassador of Lindy Hop by Frankie Manning and Cynthia R. Millman

Swingin’ at the Savoy by Norma Miller

Jazz Dance, the Story of American Vernacular Dance by Marshall and Jean Stearns

Oooh, thank you for the added information and resources!

(Also, friendly reminder to my followers to check the notes on my posts—especially on Ask-Me Monday posts—because there are often reblogs like this one. I don’t always reblog them because I try not to clog people’s dashes with almost-identical posts.)

(x)

(Source: lifeafterbeths, via laughterkey)

unamusedsloth:

Ducklings have great brakes.

unamusedsloth:

Ducklings have great brakes.

(via pleatedjeans)

laina:

laina:

laina:

this guy was watching the vmas with me and now he’s educating himself how precious is that

he keeps asking me all these questions about aspects of feminism and he’s like “so basically it’s about letting women do what they want without being judged for it” and I was like yea and he was like “oh okay that’s so simple why isn’t everyone a feminist” it’s precious

update: I banged him

laina:

laina:

laina:

this guy was watching the vmas with me and now he’s educating himself how precious is that

he keeps asking me all these questions about aspects of feminism and he’s like “so basically it’s about letting women do what they want without being judged for it” and I was like yea and he was like “oh okay that’s so simple why isn’t everyone a feminist” it’s precious

update: I banged him

(via laughterkey)

nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

(via lunasdeliveryservice)